Pietro Berti

Pietro Berti

VILLA BERTI - IMOLA VIA BEL POGGIO 13

PER ESPRIMERE IL VOSTRO PARERE

PER CHI VOLESSE ESPRIMERE IL PROPRIO PARERE SUGLI ARGOMENTI TRATTATI O VOLESSE RICHIEDERE IN MERITO AGLI STESSI DELUCIDAZIONI O CHIARIMENTI, E' POSSIBILE COMUNICARE CON ME INVIANDO UN COMMENTO (cliccando sulla scritta "commenti" è possibile inviare un commento anche in modo anonimo, selezionando l'apposito profilo che sarà pubblicato dopo l'approvazione) OPPURE TRAMITE MAIL (cliccando sulla bustina che compare accanto alla scritta "commenti")







FUSIORARI NEL MONDO

Majai Phoria

UN UOMO GIACE TRAFITTO DA UN RAGGIO DI SOLE, ED E’ SUBITO SERA

Non nobis Domine, non nobis, sed Nomini Tuo da gloriam

Non nobis Domine, non nobis, sed Nomini Tuo da gloriam

JE ME SOUVIENS

JE ME SOUVIENS

VILLA BERTI VIA BEL POGGIO N. 13 IMOLA http://www.villaberti.it/

Condizioni per l'utilizzo degli articoli pubblicati su questo blog

I contenuti degli articoli pubblicati in questo blog potranno essere utilizzati esclusivamente citando la fonte e il suo autore. In difetto, si contravverrà alle leggi sul diritto morale d’autore.
Si precisa che la citazione dovrà recare la dicitura "Pietro Berti, [titolo post] in http://pietrobertiimola.blogspot.com/"
E' poi richiesto - in ipotesi di utilizzo e/o citazione di tutto o parte del contenuto di uno e/o più post di questo blog - di voler comunicare all'autore Pietro Berti anche tramite e-mail o commento sul blog stesso l'utilizzo fatto del proprio articolo al fine di eventualmente impedirne l'utilizzo per l' ipotesi in cui l'autore non condividesse (e/o desiderasse impedire) l'uso fattone.
Auguro a voi tutti un buon viaggio nel mio blog.

Anchorage

Anchorage

venerdì 25 febbraio 2011

Phoenix Mars Lander e l'esplorazione di Marte





































Two images of the Phoenix Mars lander taken from Martian orbit in 2008 and 2010. The 2008 lander image (left) shows two relatively blue spots on either side corresponding to the spacecraft's clean circular solar panels. In the 2010 (right) image scientists see a dark shadow that could be the lander body and eastern solar panel, but no shadow from the western solar panel. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona

Phoenix Mars Lander Is Silent, New Image Shows DamageMay 25, 2010 NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander has ended operations after repeated attempts to contact the spacecraft were unsuccessful. A new image transmitted by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows signs of severe ice damage to the lander's solar panels. "The Phoenix spacecraft succeeded in its investigations and exceeded its planned lifetime," said Fuk Li, manager of the Mars Exploration Program at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. "Although its work is finished, analysis of information from Phoenix's science activities will continue for some time to come." Last week, NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter flew over the Phoenix landing site 61 times during a final attempt to communicate with the lander. No transmission from the lander was detected. Phoenix also did not communicate during 150 flights in three earlier listening campaigns this year.
May 24, 2010 -- NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander has ended operations after repeated attempts to contact the spacecraft were unsuccessful. A new image transmitted by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows signs of severe ice damage to the lander's solar panels. "The Phoenix spacecraft succeeded in its investigations and exceeded its planned lifetime," said Fuk Li, manager of the Mars Exploration Program at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. "Although its work is finished, analysis of information from Phoenix's science activities will continue for some time to come." Last week, NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter flew over the Phoenix landing site 61 times during a final attempt to communicate with the lander. No transmission from the lander was detected. Phoenix also did not communicate during 150 flights in three earlier listening campaigns this year. Earth-based research continues on discoveries Phoenix made during summer conditions at the far-northern site where it landed May 25, 2008. The solar-powered lander completed its three-month mission and kept working until sunlight waned two months later. Phoenix was not designed to survive the dark, cold, icy winter. However, the slim possibility Phoenix survived could not be eliminated without listening for the lander after abundant sunshine returned. An image of Phoenix taken this month by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment, or HiRISE, camera on board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter suggests the lander no longer casts shadows the way it did during its working lifetime. "Before and after images are dramatically different," said Michael Mellon of the University of Colorado in Boulder, a science team member for both Phoenix and HiRISE. "The lander looks smaller, and only a portion of the difference can be explained by accumulation of dust on the lander, which makes its surfaces less distinguishable from surrounding ground." Apparent changes in the shadows cast by the lander are consistent with predictions of how Phoenix could be damaged by harsh winter conditions. It was anticipated that the weight of a carbon-dioxide ice buildup could bend or break the lander's solar panels. Mellon calculated hundreds of pounds of ice probably coated the lander in mid-winter. During its mission, Phoenix confirmed and examined patches of the widespread deposits of underground water ice detected by Odyssey and identified a mineral called calcium carbonate that suggested occasional presence of thawed water. The lander also found soil chemistry with significant implications for life and observed falling snow. The mission's biggest surprise was the discovery of perchlorate, an oxidizing chemical on Earth that is food for some microbes and potentially toxic for others. "We found that the soil above the ice can act like a sponge, with perchlorate scavenging water from the atmosphere and holding on to it," said Peter Smith, Phoenix principal investigator at the University of Arizona in Tucson. "You can have a thin film layer of water capable of being a habitable environment. A micro-world at the scale of grains of soil -- that's where the action is." The perchlorate results are shaping subsequent astrobiology research, as scientists investigate the implications of its antifreeze properties and potential use as an energy source by microbes. Discovery of the ice in the uppermost soil by Odyssey pointed the way for Phoenix. More recently, the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter detected numerous ice deposits in middle latitudes at greater depth using radar and exposed on the surface by fresh impact craters. "Ice-rich environments are an even bigger part of the planet than we thought," Smith said. "Somewhere in that vast region there are going to be places that are more habitable than others." The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter reached the planet in 2006 to begin a two-year primary science mission. Its data show Mars had diverse wet environments at many locations for differing durations during the planet's history, and climate-change cycles persist into the present era. The mission has returned more planetary data than all other Mars missions combined. Odyssey has been orbiting Mars since 2001. The mission also has played important roles by supporting the twin Mars rovers Spirit and Opportunity. The Phoenix mission was led by Smith at the University of Arizona, with project management at JPL and development partnership at Lockheed Martin in Denver. The University of Arizona operates the HiRISE camera, which was built by Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corp., in Boulder. Mars missions are managed by JPL for NASA's Mars Exploration Program at NASA Headquarters in Washington. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

The Phoenix Mars Mission has a collaborative approach to space exploration. As the very first of NASA's Mars Scout class, Phoenix combines legacy and innovation in a framework of a true partnership: government, academia, and industry. Scout class missions are led by a scientist, known as a Principal Investigator (PI). Peter Smith of the University of Arizona's Lunar and Planetary Laboratory serves as Phoenix's PI and is responsible for all aspects of the mission
The Phoenix Mission has a three-vertebrae backbone: the PI at the University of Arizona, the project manager at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), and the flight system manager at Lockheed Martin Space Systems (LMSS). These three frequently communicate and ensure that decisions are understood and quickly implemented by the team. PI Smith has delegated project management responsibility to JPL. Barry Goldstein serves as the project manager and leads an experienced team of JPL engineers and scientists. Under Goldstein, the JPL team conducts vital functions of payload management, and flight systems and mission operations. These functions are supported by system engineering, mission assurance, and a business office. JPL also provides the interface to the Deep Space Network, sending command sequences and receiving data. During the 10-month cruise phase to Mars, JPL maintains the proper cruise trajectory to get the spacecraft to Mars by performing correcting maneuvers. Finally, JPL will lead the Phoenix spacecraft through the highly risky entry-descent-landing process. No team surpasses JPL in its ability to land spacecraft safely on the Martian surface. Ed Sedivy leads the Lockheed Martin engineering team in designing, constructing, and testing the Phoenix spacecraft. Sedivy was Lockheed Martin's chief engineer for developing the Mars Surveyor 2001 lander, the highly capable spacecraft that the Phoenix Mission is inheriting. The Lockheed Martin engineering team is restoring the 2001 lander to a flight-ready Phoenix spacecraft and developing enhanced spacecraft reliability through extensive testing. Throughout all phases of the mission, the Lockheed Martin team will closely monitor Phoenix's health by linking their spacecraft operations centers with those at JPL and the University of Arizona. From the University of Arizona, PI Smith works closely with Leslie Tamppari, project scientist at JPL, to lead an international assembly of scientists from a wide variety of academic, private, and government research institutions. This science team has experience in all previous landed Mars missions. The team's scientific background includes experience in hydrology, geology, chemistry, biology, and atmospheric science. For operations, the team is conceptually divided into four instrument groupings, each with a lead co-investigator (Co-I) scientist. The groups are not intended to be restrictive: Co-Is are expected to have a broad, cross-instrument participation driven by scientific objectives. The science team will co-locate for the first three months of the mission, to operate all the instruments and to perform the first analysis on data that may provide important answers to the following questions: (1) can the Martian arctic support life, (2) what is the history of water at the landing site, and (3) how is the Martian climate affected by polar dynamics? To answer these questions, Phoenix uses some of the most sophisticated and advanced technology ever sent to Mars. A robust robotic arm built by JPL digs through the soil to the water ice layer underneath, and delivers soil and ice samples to the mission's experiments. On the deck, miniature ovens and a mass spectrometer, built by the University of Arizona and University of Texas-Dallas, will provide chemical analysis of trace matter. A chemistry lab-in-a-box, assembled by JPL, will characterize the soil and ice chemistry. Imaging systems, designed by the University of Arizona, University of Neuchatel (Switzerland) (providing an atomic force microscope), Max Planck Institute (Germany) and Malin Space Science Systems, will provide an unprecedented view of Mars—spanning 12 powers of 10 in scale. The Canadian Space Agency will deliver a meteorological station, marking the first significant involvement of Canada in a mission to Mars. The University of Arizona will also host the Phoenix Mission's Science Operations Center (SOC) in its Tucson facility. From the SOC, the Phoenix science and engineering teams will command the lander once it is safely landed on Mars, and also, receive data as it is transmitted directly to Earth. A payload interoperability test bed (PIT) will be located with the SOC to verify an optimal integration of Phoenix's complex scientific instruments. Working together, the SOC and PIT will ensure a seamless scientific and engineering process—from science goal to instrument commands to down-linked and analyzed data. As with all major NASA missions, Phoenix has a comprehensive education and public outreach program. PI Smith leads the program, which is managed by the University of Arizona, and connects to outstanding educational resources in the desert southwest region, and throughout the U.S. This powerful team is the cornerstone to the Phoenix mission, which has high hopes to be the first mission to "touch" and examine water on Mars—ultimately, to pave the way for future robotic missions, and possibly, human exploration. Learn more about the Mission History or get answers to Frequently Asked Questions.


Phoenix Mars Lander è una sonda automatica sviluppata dalla NASA per l'esplorazione del pianeta Marte. La missione scientifica della sonda è studiare l'ambiente marziano per verificarne la possibilità di sostenere forme di vita microbiche e per studiare l'eventuale presenza di acqua nell'ambiente. La sonda è stata lanciata il 4 agosto 2007 alle 05:26:34 am EDT[1] da un razzo Delta II 7925 prodotto dalla Boeing ed è atterrata su Marte il 25 maggio 2008 alle 23:38 UTC. La sonda è un programma congiunto del Lunar and Planetary Laboratory e dell'Università dell'Arizona sotto direzione NASA. Al programma partecipano anche università statunitensi, canadesi, svizzere, tedesche, la Canadian Space Agency ed alcune imprese aerospaziali. La sonda è atterrata nei pressi della calotta polare settentrionale del pianeta, una regione ricca di ghiaccio, e un braccio robot cercherà nel terreno artico eventuali tracce di acqua e microbi. Dal 10 novembre 2008 la missione è dichiarata conclusa.
Il lander Phoenix è la sesta sonda ad atterrare sul pianeta rosso e la terza, dopo i Viking 1 e 2 ad utilizzare dei propulsori per controllare la discesa.
Indice[nascondi]
1 Storia
2 Lancio
3 Atterraggio
4 Missione
4.1 Indagini scientifiche
4.1.1 Conferma della presenza di ghiaccio
4.1.2 Test chimici
4.1.3 Chimica umida
4.2 Termine delle operazioni
5 Carico scientifico
5.1 Braccio robotizzato
5.2 Robotic Arm Camera (RAC)
5.3 Surface Stereo Imager (SSI)
5.4 Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA)
5.5 Mars Descent Imager (MARDI)
5.6 Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA)
5.7 Meteorological Station (MET)
6 Il DVD
7 Galleria Fotografica
8 Risultati missione
9 Elenco immagini ad alta risoluzione (HiRISE - Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter)
10 Note
11 Voci correlate
12 Collegamenti esterni
13 Altri progetti
//
[modifica] Storia
La NASA selezionò la missione Phoenix dell'Università dell'Arizona per il lancio del 2007 nell'agosto del 2003. La missione è la prima di una serie di piccole missioni note come Scout[2] progettate per competere con il Mars Exploration Program dell'Agenzia Spaziale Europea. La selezione per la missione Phoenix durò due anni e si svolse in competizione con altri istituti. I 325 milioni di dollari pagati dalla NASA per la missione superano di sei volte come costo qualunque precedente ricerca svolta dall'Università dell'Arizona. Il costo totale della missione è di 420 milioni di dollari.[1]
Il Dr. Peter H. Smith del Lunar and Planetary Laboratory dell'Università dell'Arizona, direttore del progetto, scelse per la missione il nome Phoenix prendendo spunto dalla fenice della mitologia, l'uccello in grado di risorgere dalle proprie ceneri. Con Phoenix, infatti, fu ripresa la progettazione di un lander che sarebbe dovuto essere lanciato nel 2001 ma la cui missione era stata cancellata. La Lockheed Martin comunque lo aveva quasi completato e decise di mantenerlo in sospeso per poterlo riutilizzare. Dopo la selezione Smith disse "Sono molto felice di poter iniziare il vero lavoro che porterà ad una missione di successo su Marte".

La sonda una volta montata nel razzo. (NASA)
Phoenix è stato un programma congiunto del Lunar and Planetary Laboratory e dell'Università dell'Arizona sotto direzione NASA. Gli strumenti scientifici sono stati sviluppati dall'Università della California, il Jet Propulsion Laboratory di Pasadena della NASA si è occupato del progetto della missione e della sua gestione. La Lockheed Martin Space Systems di Denver (Colorado) ha prodotto la sonda e si è occupato delle verifiche della stessa. La Canadian Space Agency ha sviluppato la stazione meteorologica, compreso un innovativo sensore atmosferico basato su tecnologia laser. Tra gli istituti di ricerca secondari vi sono il Malin Space Science Systems (California), il Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research (Germania), il NASA Ames Research Center (California), NASA Johnson Space Center (Texas), l'Optech Incorporated, SETI Institute, il Texas A&M University, la Tufts University, l'University of Colorado, l'University of Michigan, l'University of Neuchâtel (Svizzera), l'University of Texas at Dallas, l'University of Washington, la Washington University in St. Louis, e la York University (Canada).
Il 2 giugno 2005 dopo le prime critiche dei membri il progetto preliminare venne rivisto e la NASA lo approvò per la realizzazione.[3]
La sonda è atterrata utilizzando i razzi per rallentare la discesa, così come era accaduto nel programma Viking.[4] Nel 2007 il professore Dirk Schulze-Makuch della Washington State University inviò un documento all'American Astronomical Society nel quale ipotizzava che i razzi delle missioni Viking potessero aver ucciso gli eventuali microrganismi presenti nella zona dell'atterraggio.[5] Tale ipotesi arrivò quando la missione era oramai in fase avanzata e modifiche sostanziali non potevano essere fatte senza rimandare la missione. Chris McKay uno degli scienziati che si occupavano del progetto per la NASA affermò pubblicamente di ritenere tali preoccupazioni infondate. Esperimenti condotti da Nilton Penno dell'Università del Michigan con i suoi studenti hanno analizzato l'influenza dei razzi sulla superficie ed hanno evidenziato che il danneggiamento è minimo. Le modalità di atterraggio non dovrebbero quindi influenzare la missione.[6]
[modifica] Lancio

Phoenix lanciato con il razzo Delta II 7925 (NASA)
Phoenix è stato lanciato il 4 agosto 2007 alle 5:26:34 a.m. EDT (09:26:34 UTC) da un razzo Delta II 7925 dal Pad 17-A dalla Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. La finestra di lancio utile partiva il 3 agosto e terminava il 24 agosto. La ridotta finestra di lancio ha costretto la NASA a spostare il lancio della sonda Dawn che originariamente doveva partire il 7 luglio, la sonda è stata spostata in settembre. Il Delta 7925 è stato scelto anche per la sua affidabilità, il razzo ha lanciato i rover Spirit e Opportunity e il Mars Pathfinder nel 1996[7].
[modifica] Atterraggio

Zona di atterraggio del Phoenix Mars Lander
Dopo un viaggio di dieci mesi e 680 milioni di chilometri, il 25 maggio 2008 alle ore 11:38 UTC (01:38 del 26 maggio, ora italiana), il "Phoenix Mars Lander" atterrava su Marte. Le manovre sono state seguite contemporaneamente, primo caso nella storia dell'esplorazione del pianeta rosso, da tre sonde in orbita al momento dell'arrivo della Phoenix: Mars Odyssey e Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter della NASA e Mars Express Orbiter dell'ESA. Questo ha permesso di monitorare le varie fasi dell'atterraggio con una precisione superiore rispetto alle precedenti missioni. Il sito di atterraggio prescelto era un'ellisse di 100x20 km di ampiezza, in una regione vicino al polo nord del pianeta chiamata in modo informale "Green Valley". Questa regione è stata scelta perché, in base ai dati pervenuti dalle sonde attualmente in orbita attorno al pianeta, essa contiene la maggior concentrazione di acqua ghiacciata al di fuori dei poli. L'ingresso nell'atmosfera marziana è avvenuto all'1:46:33 UTC del 26 maggio alla velocità di quasi 20.000 km/h; la capsula contenente la sonda è stata dunque frenata prima dall'attrito dell'atmosfera e successivamente dall'apertura di un paracadute alle 1:50:15 è stato dispiegato il paracadute. Quindici secondi dopo è stato distaccato lo scudo termico. L'accelerazione negativa di picco è stata stimata in circa 9,2 g, raggiunta alle 1:47:00 UTC. Arrivata alla quota di un chilometro sopra la superficie con una velocità di otto chilometri orari, la sonda si è infine staccata dalla capsula ed ha percorso l'ultimo tratto a velocità costante, sostenuta, come per le precedenti missioni Viking, da un sistema di razzi frenanti che le hanno permesso anche di orientarsi in modo da distendere i pannelli solari in direzione est-ovest, la migliore per ricevere i raggi del sole. L'atterraggio è stato effettuato all'1:53:52 UTC[8]. Il ritardo di 7 secondi nell'apertura del paracadute ha comportato uno spostamento del luogo di atterraggio effettivo di 25-28 km a est, vicino al bordo dell'ellisse prevista.
La camera HiRISE del Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter ha ripreso la sonda Phoenix mentre stava scendendo attraverso l'atmosfera marziana rallentata dal paracadute. Questa immagine è la prima mai ripresa di una sonda durante l'atterraggio su un altro pianeta[8][9] (La pecedenti immagini di allunaggi non contano in questa classifica, poiché la Luna non è un pianeta ma un satellite naturale). La stessa camera ha ripreso la sonda sulla superficie con risoluzione sufficiente a poter distinguere il lander e i due pannelli solari. I controllori di volo hanno utilizzato un tracciamento Doppler fornito dagli orbiter Odyssey e Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter per determinare la posizione esatta di Phoenix, alle coordinate 68.218830°N 234.250778°E[10].
L'atterraggio è avvenuto in una regione pianeggiante e sostanzialmente priva di asperità chiamata Vastitas Borealis, nella tarda primavera dell'emisfero marziano settentrionale, quando il Sole illumina i pannelli solari della sonda per tutto il giorno. L'elevazione solare varia da 3,2° a 46,3° il 25 maggio, da 3,9° a 47° il 25 giugno e da 0° a 43° il 2 settembre. La sonda vedrà quindi il primo tramonto all'inizio di settembre 2008. Subito prima dell'atterraggio, la sonda ha utilizzato i sui propulsori per orientare i pannelli solari lungo l'asse est-ovest e massimizzare la generazione di energia. Dopo pochi minuti la sonda ha disteso i due pannelli solari ed ha inviato verso la Terra le prime immagini dal sito di atterraggio. Esse sono giunte attorno alle 2:00 UTC del 26 maggio 2008[11], e mostrano una superficie priva di rocce e incisa con piccoli solchi lunghi 5 m e alti 10 cm che disegnano delle forme vagamente poligonali.

Zone di atterraggio previste (NASA)

Stima iniziale della posizione effettiva di atterraggio rispetto a quella prevista (NASA)

Prima immagine dal sito di atterraggio

Fotografia ad ampia panoramica ripresa dal MRO della sonda Phoenix durante la discesa

Dettaglio ingrandito della sonda durante la discesa
[modifica] Missione

Stemma della missione

Cronologia eventi. (NASA)
La missione ha due obiettivi, il primo è lo studio della passata presenza di acqua sul pianeta, un'informazione chiave per comprendere i passati cambiamenti climatici del pianeta. Il secondo obiettivo è la ricerca di zone vivibili sul pianeta. Gli strumenti della Phoenix sono progettati per studiare i cambiamenti dell'artico marziano. La regione dove è atterrata Phoenix è troppo fredda per permettere all'acqua di esistere in forma liquida ma ogni 50.000 anni per via delle periodiche modificazioni dell'orbita di Marte la regione diventa abbastanza calda per fondere l'acqua e in queste condizioni se la vita esiste dovrebbe svilupparsi. La missione vuole verificare l'esistenza o meno della vita su Marte. Questa missione segue la strategia NASA di far ricerche "seguendo" l'acqua.
La missione primaria è durata 90 giorni, e a seguito delle buone condizioni della sonda la NASA ha deciso il 31 luglio 2008 di estendere la missione di altre cinque settimane[12].
[modifica] Indagini scientifiche

Mosaico di immagine che mostra la struttura poligonale del suolo, probabilmente causata dal permafrost marziano
La struttura poligonale delle crepe nel terreno è stata osservata in precedenza dall'orbita, ed è simile a quella presente sulla Terra nelle regioni dove è presente il permafrost. Probabilmente il ghiaccio del permafrost si contrae quando la temperatura diminuisce, creando una serie di crepe che vengono riempite dal terreno. Quando la temperatura aumenta e il ghiaccio si espande, non può assumere nuovamente la forma precedente ed è costretto a muoversi verso l'alto[13].
Il braccio robotico della sonda, dopo alcuni giorni di test[14], ha iniziato a scavare il terreno il 31 maggio 2008, raccogliendo dei campioni per iniziare la ricerca del ghiaccio. La camera collegata al braccio ha ripreso una immagine del terreno posto sotto il lander durante il sol 5, dove si possono notare delle piccole regioni chiare e lisce di terreno, che sono state portate alla luce quando i propulsori della sonda hanno spazzato via lo strato di terreno morbido che le ricopriva. È stato ipotizzato che queste parti chiare di terreno potrebbero contenere ghiaccio[15].
[modifica] Conferma della presenza di ghiaccio
Il 19 giugno 2008 la NASA ha annunciato che nello scavo compiuto dal braccio robotico sono state osservate delle zone di materiale chiaro, delle dimensioni di pochi centimetri, che sono scomparse nell'arco di 4 giorni. Questa scoperta implica che, molto probabilmente, erano composte di ghiaccio d'acqua, che è sublimato a seguito della sua esposizione. Sebbene anche il ghiaccio secco sublimi alle condizioni di temperatura e pressione registrate dal lander, avrebbe dovuto farlo tuttavia molto più velocemente [16][17].
[modifica] Test chimici

Due immagini, riprese a distanza di qualche giorno, che mostrano delle parti chiare nel terreno sottostante la superficie che sono parzialmente sublimate
Il 24 giugno sono iniziati una serie di test chimici importanti. Il braccio robotico ha scavato raccogliendo altri campioni di terreno e depositandoli sui tre analizzatori presenti sulla sonda: un forno che ha scaldato il terreno e ha analizzato i gas emessi, un microscopio e un mini laboratorio di chimica delle soluzioni acquose[18]. Il 26 giugno 2008 la sonda, ha iniziato ad inviare i primi risultati dei test con informazioni sul terreno tra cui i sali presenti e l'acidità. Il laboratorio per la chimica delle soluzioni acquose fa parte di un gruppo di strumenti chiamato Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA).
I primi risultati hanno mostrato che il terreno superficiale è moderatamente alcalino, con un pH compreso tra 8 e 9. Sono stati trovati ioni di magnesio, sodio, potassio e cloruro. Il livello totale di salinità è modesto. Questi valori sono stati giudicati sufficientemente positivi dal punto di vista biologico. Le analisi del primo campione hanno indicato la presenza di molecole di acqua e anidride carbonica che sono state rilasciate dai minerali contenuti nel campione di terreno durante l'ultimo ciclo di riscaldamento (con temperature attorno ai 1000 °C)[19].
Le analisi di un campione di terreno, raccolto il 30 luglio e riscaldato nel forno presente sulla sonda, hanno fornito la prima prova, da analisi di laboratorio, della presenza di acqua libera sulla superficie di Marte.[12].
Il 31 luglio 2008 la NASA ha annunciato che la sonda aveva confermato la presenza di ghiaccio d'acqua su Marte, come ipotizzato dai dati dell'orbiter Mars Odyssey. Durante il ciclo di riscaldamento di un campione di suolo, lo spettrometro di massa del TEGA ha rilevato vapore acqueo quando la temperatura del campione ha raggiunto gli 0 °C[20][21].
L'acqua in forma liquida non può esistere in superficie a causa della pressione atmosferica eccessivamente bassa, tranne per brevi periodi di tempo ad altitudini inferiori[22][23].
Con le buone condizioni di operatività di Phoenix, la NASA ha annunciato l'estensione della missione fino al 30 settembre 2008. Il team scientifico, dopo la conferma della presenza d'acqua, si pose come obiettivo determinare se il ghiaccio si sia trasformato in acqua liquida a sufficienza per poter sostenere i processi legati alla vita e se siano presenti gli ingredienti chimici necessari alla vita.
[modifica] Chimica umida
Il 24 giugno 2008 gli scienziati NASA lanciarono una delle serie principali di analisi scientifiche. Il braccio robotico raccolse ulteriori campioni di terreno e li mise in 3 diversi analizzatori di bordo: un forno che riscaldava il campione ed analizzava i gas emessi, un microscopio e un laboratorio di chimica umida[24]. Esso comprende un gruppo di strumenti chiamato Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA). Il braccio robotico venne posizionato sopra il laboratorio di bordo di chimica umida nel Sol 29[25] (il 29º giorno marziano dall'inizio della missione) e il Sol successivo venne trasferito il campione nello strumento, che effettuò il primo esperimento di chimica umida. Infine, nel Sol 31 (26 giugno 2008) la sonda inviò i risultati contenenti informazioni sui sali e l'acidità del terreno.
I risultati preliminari inviti a Terra mostrarono che il terreno superficiale è moderatamente alcalino, con un pH compreso tra 8 e 9. Vennero trovati ioni di magnesio, sodio, potassio e cloruro. La valore totale di salinità era modesto. I livelli di cloruro erano bassi, quindi il gruppo di anioni presenti non venne inizialmente identificato. I livelli di pH e di salinità furono interpretati come positivi dal punto di vista dello sviluppo di forme biologiche. Le analisi del laboratorio TEGA del primo campione di terreno indicarono la presenza di acqua legata e CO2 che vennero rilasciate durante l'ultimo ciclo di riscaldamento (quello a temperatura maggiore, attorno a 1 000 °C)[26].
Il 1 agosto 2008 la rivista Aviation Week riferì che "La Casa Bianca è stata avvertita dalla NASA su un imminente annuncio riguardante importanti scoperte sulle potenzialità di vita su Marte"[27]. Questo annuncio fece aumentare le speculazioni dei media sulla possibile scoperta di prove della presenza di vita passata o presente su Marte[28][29][30]. Per attenuare le speculazioni, la NASA rilasciò i risultati preliminari e non confermati delle analisi, che suggerivano la presenza di perclorato sul suolo marziano. Questo risultato rende il pianeta maggiormente ostile alle forme di vita di quanto non si fosse pensato in precedenza[31][32].
[modifica] Termine delle operazioni
Il 28 ottobre 2008 la sonda è entrata in modalità di sicurezza a causa della scarsità di energia disponibile. Infatti, l'insolazione è andata via via diminuendo nel corso della missione con l'avvicinarsi dell'inverno marziano e la quantità di energia che può essere ricavata dalla conversione della luce solare attraverso i pannelli fotovoltaici è diminuita di conseguenza. La NASA ha quindi accelerato i piani per lo spegnimento dei quattro riscaldatori che mantengono la temperatura della strumentazione. Dopo il ripristino della modalità operativa, sono stati inviati i comandi per spegnere due riscaldatori invece di uno, come era previsto inizialmente. Essi forniscono calore al braccio robotico, al laboratorio TEGA e ad un'unità pirotecnica sul lander che non è stata mai usata. Successivamente sono stati spenti i relativi strumenti.
Dal 2 novembre 2008, dopo una breve comunicazione con la Terra, la sonda non ha più dato segni di vita. Il 10 novembre 2008, tre mesi dopo il termine previsto, la missione è stata dichiarata terminata. Gli ingegneri della NASA continueranno a tentare di mettersi in contatto con la sonda, sebbena si ritenga ipotesi certa che l'inverno marziano a quelle latitudini sia troppo rigido per Phoenix. [33] [34]
La sonda era stata progettata per una durata di 90 giorni e la sua missione era stata prolungata dopo che la missione primaria era terminata con successo ad agosto 2008.[35]
Sarà difficile che Phoenix possa superare il periodo di scarsa illuminazione, anche se teoricamente il computer a bordo della sonda dispone di una modalità sicura che prevede il ripristino delle comunicazioni quando e se la sonda potrà ricaricare le batterie durante la primavera successiva.
[modifica] Carico scientifico
Il lander era stato progettato e testato per essere un componente della missione Mars Surveyor 2001 Lander, ma il progetto venne cancellato dopo la perdita del Mars Polar Lander che dopo l'atterraggio nella regione polare sud di Marte nel dicembre 1999 non diede più segni di vita. Sin d'allora il lander è stato ospitato in una camera bianca della Lockheed Martin a Denver, gestita dalla NASA per il programma Mars Exploration Program.
Rinominata Phoenix, le venne integrata una versione migliorata della fotocamera panoramica dell'University of Arizona e uno strumento di analisi degli elementi volatili derivato da quello presente nel Mars Polar Lander: inoltre la sonda include esperimenti sviluppati per il programma Mars Surveyor 2001 come il braccio robot e il microscopio per le analisi chimiche e batteriologiche. Gli strumenti scientifici includono una fotocamera per le immagini durante la discesa e degli strumenti meteorologici[36].
[modifica] Braccio robotizzato
Il braccio robotizzato del Phoenix è in grado di scavare nel terreno fino a mezzo metro sotto la superficie e quindi prelevare dal terreno dei campioni che saranno immessi in microforni.
[modifica] Robotic Arm Camera (RAC)
Questa camera a colori è collegata al braccio robotico e riprende fotografie dell'area e dei campioni raccolti, in particolare i granelli dell'area che è stata scavata dal braccio.
[modifica] Surface Stereo Imager (SSI)
È la camera stereo principale della sonda, descritta come "un aggiornamento a più alta risoluzione della camera presente sul Mars Pathfinder e sul Mars Polar Lander"[37]. Riprenderà immagini stereo della regione artica marziana e misurerà, utilizzando il Sole come riferimento, la distorsione atmosferica del pianeta. [38] [39]
[modifica] Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA)
Questo strumento è una combinazione di un forno ad alta temperatura con uno spettrometro di massa che utilizzato per scaldare campioni della polvere marziana e determinarne il contenuto. Sono presenti 8 microforni diversi, che permetteranno di effettuare 8 analisi di campioni, una per ciascun microforno, non essendo possibile reimpiegare un microforno per una successiva analisi. Si possono analizzare le quantità di vapore acqueo e anidride carbonica sprigionate, di ghiaccio d'acqua e minerali contenuti nel campioni. Lo strumento è in grado di misurare i composti volatili organici fino a 10 ppb. [40]
[modifica] Mars Descent Imager (MARDI)
Il Mars Descend Imager scatterà delle immagini del suolo marziano durante la discesa del lander, dopo il distacco dell'aeroshell circa 5 miglia sopra alla superficie. Prima del lancio è stato rilevato un potenziale problema nell'hardware che deve gestire i dati delle immagini. Di conseguenza, i pianificatori della missione hanno deciso di riprendere solo una fotografia con questo strumento[41], sperando che essa possa comunque aiutare ad individuare esattamente dove il lander sta atterrando e trovare potenziali obiettivi scientifici. Inoltre si potrebbe anche capire se il luogo di atterraggio si trova su un terreno tipico della regione. [42] MARDI sarà la camera più leggera a raggiungere il pianeta rosso e la più efficiente, con consumo di soli 3 W durante l'elaborazione delle immagini.
[modifica] Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA)
Questo strumento verrà utilizzato per esaminare piccole particelle grandi 16 micrometri. Misurerà la conducibilità elettrica e la conducibilità termica delle particelle tramite una sonda inclusa nel braccio robot. Uno degli esperimenti più interessanti è il laboratorio chimico in acqua. Smith ha detto a proposito di questo esperimento: "Progettiamo di scavare del terreno e inserirlo in un contenitore. Poi vi aggiungeremo dell'acqua, agiteremo e misureremo le impurità dissolte nell'acqua. Questo esperimento è molto importante perché permetterà di determinare se in quell'ambiente i microbi possono sopravvivere. Se il terreno sarà troppo acido, basico o con troppi ossidanti sapremo che la vita lì non poteva sopravvivere. Questo esperimento testerà la possibilità dell'ambiente di sostenere la vita."
[modifica] Meteorological Station (MET)
MET registrerà la situazione meteorologica giornaliera durante la missione attraverso vari sensori per la temperatura e la pressione. È inoltre presente il Laser Imaging Detection and Ranging, per misurare la quantità di particelle di polvere presenti nell'atmosfera.







L'associazione Planetary Society ha composto un DVD[43] che è stato agganciato sul lander, contenente una collezione multimediale di letteratura e di arte che riguarda il pianeta rosso chiamata Visions from Mars[44]. Tra le opere sono stati inclusi il testo de La Guerra dei Mondi di H.G. Wells (e la famigerata trasmissione radio di Orson Welles), Mars as the Abode of Life di Percival Lowell con una mappa dei canali di Marte, le Cronache marziane di Ray Bradbury e Green Mars di Kim Stanley Robinson. Sono anche presenti dei messaggi destinati ai futuri visitatori marziani, tra cui quelli scritti da Carl Sagan e Arthur C. Clarke. Nell'autunno 2006, la Planetary Society ha anche raccolto circa 250000 nomi inviati attraverso internet.
Il DVD è costituito di un particolare materiale che è stato pensato per resistere alle condizioni climatiche di Marte, in modo da conservare per centinaia (e forse migliaia) di anni i dati.







Risultati missione
Atterrata con successo il 26 maggio 2008 alle 01:53 ora italiana (UTC+2).
Fotografata in volo durante l'atterraggio dalla telecamera HiRISE a bordo del Mars Reconaissance Orbiter
Fotografata al suolo (visibili sonda, paracadute, scudo termico) - Codice immagine HiRISE: PSP_008591_2485 (orbita 8591, posizione 248,5 gradi latitudine rispetto all'equatore notturno (v. pagina dedicata)
Posizione luogo di atterraggio: 68.218830°N 234.250778°E (125.749222 W) (fonte)
[modifica] Elenco immagini ad alta risoluzione (HiRISE - Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter)
- View over Heimdall crater while landing
- Landing site after 11 hours (PSP_008585_2915)
- Landing site after 22 hours (PSP_008591_2485)
- 3d views of landing site after landing - Made up of PSP_008644_2485 and PSP_008591_2485
[modifica] Note
^ a b La sonda Phoenix è partita a caccia di vita su Marte. Repubblica, 4-8-2007. URL consultato il 4-8-2007.
^ NASA. Mars 2007 'Phoenix' will Study Water near Mars' North Pole. 04-08-2003. URL consultato il 02-04-2006.
^ NASA. NASA's Phoenix Mars Mission Begins Launch Preparations. 02-06-2005. URL consultato il 02-04-2006.
^ Phoenix Mars lander set to lift off. New Scientist, 03-08-2007. URL consultato il 04-08-2007.
^ Seth Borenstein. "Did probes find Martian life ... or kill it off?". Associated Press via MSNBC, 08-01-2007. URL consultato il 31-05-2007.
^ Jim Erickson. "U-M scientists simulate the effects of blowing Mars dust on NASA's Phoenix lander, due for August launch". University of Michigan News Service, 07-06-2007
^ Phoenix Mars Mission - Launch. University of Arizona
^ a b NASA. Phoenix Lands on Mars!. 25-05-2008
^ NASA. «Phoenix Makes a Grand Entrance». URL consultato in data 27-05-2008.
^ Emily Lakdawalla. Phoenix Sol 2 press conference, in a nutshell. Planetary Society, 27-05-2008. URL consultato il 28-05-2008.
^ Phoenix Mars Mission - Gallery. Arizona University, 26-05-2008
^ a b NASA. NASA Spacecraft Confirms Martian Water, Mission Extended. 31-07-2008. URL consultato il 01-08-2008.
^ William Harwood. Satellite orbiting Mars imaged descending Phoenix. Spaceflight Now web site, 26-05-2008. URL consultato il 26-05-2008.
^ The Tech Herald. Surface ice found as Phoenix prepares to dig. 01-06-2008. URL consultato il 31-07-2008.
^ A. J. S. Rayl. Holy Cow, Snow Queen! Phoenix Landed on Ice Team Thinks. The Planetary Society, 01-06-2008. URL consultato il 03-06-2008.
^ NASA. Bright Chunks at Phoenix Lander's Mars Site Must Have Been Ice. 19-06-2008
^ A. J. S. Rayl. Phoenix Scientists Confirm Water-Ice on Mars. The Planetary Society, 21-06-2008. URL consultato il 23-06-2008.
^ computerworld.com.au. NASA: With Martian ice discovered, major tests beginning
^ Emily Lakdawalla. Phoenix sol 30 update: Alkaline soil, not very salty, "nothing extreme" about it!. The Planetary Society, 26-06-2008. URL consultato il 26-06-2008.
^ John Johnson. There's water on Mars, NASA confirms. Los Angeles Times, 01-08-2008. URL consultato il 01-08-2008.
^ Marte, la prova che c'è acqua Toccata e «assaggiata» dalla sonda. Corriere della Sera, 01-08-2008. URL consultato il 10-11-2008.
^ "condizioni come quelle attualmente presenti su Marte, al di fuori della regione di stabilità temperatura-pressione dell'acqua liquida [...] L'acqua liquida è tipicamente stabile ad altitudini più basse ed a basse latitudini del pianeta poiché la pressione atmosferica è maggiore rispetto alla pressione dii vapore dell'acqua e le temperature superficiali nelle regioni equatoriali possono raggiungere valori attorno a 273 K in alcune parti del giorno"Heldmann, Jennifer L., et al. (07-05-2005). Formation of Martian gullies by the action of liquid water flowing under current Martian environmental conditions. Journal of Geophysical Research 110: Eo5004. DOI:10.1029/2004JE002261. URL consultato il 14-09-2008.
^ "Le regioni a latitudini maggiori sono coperte con un mantello stratificato, liscio e ricco di ghiaccio"V.-P. Kostama; M. A. Kreslavsky, J. W. Head. Recent high-latitude icy mantle in the northern plains of Mars: Characteristics and ages of emplacement, Vol. 33, pp. L11201. 03-06-2006. URL consultato il 12-08-2007.
^ Sharon Gaudin. NASA: With Martian ice discovered, major tests beginning. Computerworld, 24-06-2008. URL consultato il 10-11-2008.
^ Phoenix Poised to Deliver Sample for Wet Chemistry. University of Arizona, 24-06-2008. URL consultato il 10-11-2008.
^ Emily Lakdawalla. Phoenix sol 30 update: Alkaline soil, not very salty, "nothing extreme" about it!. The Planetary Society, 16-06-2008. URL consultato il 26-06-2008.
^ Craig Covault. White House Briefed On Potential For Mars Life. Aviation Week, 01-08-2008. URL consultato il 01-08-2008.
^ Speculation That The First Atomic Force Microscope on Mars Has Found Evidence of Life on Mars. 04-08-2008. URL consultato il 10-11-2008.
^ The MECA story, A place for speculation. unmannedspaceflight.com, 21-07-2008
^ The White House is Briefed: Phoenix About to Announce "Potential For Life" on Mars. Universe Today, 02-08-2008
^ John Johnson. Perchlorate found in Martian soil. Los Angeles Times, 06-08-2008
^ Martian Life Or Not? NASA's Phoenix Team Analyzes Results. Science Daily, 06-08-2008
^ Mars Phoenix Lander Finishes Successful Work on Red Planet. NASA, 10-11-2008. URL consultato il 11-11-2008.
^ Nasa Mars mission declared dead. BBC News, 10-11-2008. URL consultato il 11-11-2008.
^ Phoenix Mission Status Report. Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 29-10-2008. URL consultato il 10-11-2008.
^ Shotwell R. (2005). Phoenix—the first Mars Scout mission. Acta Astronautica 57: 121 – 134. DOI:10.1016/j.actaastro.2005.03.038.
^ Phoenix Mars Lander- SSI. URL consultato il 02-04-2006.
^ P. H. Smith, R. Reynolds, J. Weinberg, T. Friedman, M. T. Lemmon, R. Tanner, R. J. Reid, R. L. Marcialis, B. J. Bos, C. Oquest, H. U. Keller, W. J. Markiewicz, R. Kramm,F. Gliem and P. Rueffer (2001). The MVACS Surface Stereo Imager on Mars Polar Lander. Journal of Geophysical Research 106 (E8): 17,589 –17,607.
^ Reynolds R.O.,Smith P.H., Bell L.S., Keller, H.U. (2001). The design of Mars lander cameras for Mars Pathfinder, MarsSurveyor '98 and Mars Surveyor '01. IEEE Transactions on Instrumentation and Measurement 50 (1): 63-71. DOI:10.1109/19.903879.
^ Boynton, W. V.; Quinn, R. C. (2005). Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer: Part of the Mars Volatile and Climate Surveyor integrated payload. Journal of Geophysical Research 106 (E8): 17683-17698. DOI:10.1029/1999JE001153.
^ One image planned during descent of Phoenix. The University of Arizona, 03-07-2007
^ Malin, M. C.; Caplinger, M. A.; Carr, M. H.; Squyres, S.; Thomas, P.; Veverka, J. (2005). Mars Descent Imager (MARDI) on the Mars Polar Lander. Journal of Geophysical Research 106 (E8): 17635-17650. DOI:10.1029/1999JE001144.
^ The Phoenix DVD
^ Visions of Mars: A Message to the Future
[modifica] Voci correlate
Programma Mars Scout
Esplorazione di Marte
[modifica] Collegamenti esterni
(EN) sito ufficiale progetto Phoenix
(EN) Phoenix al JPL
Sito di atterraggio su Google Mars
sito di atterraggio sul visualizzatore World Wind della NASA (richiesta installazione)
[modifica] Altri progetti
Commons
Wikimedia Commons contiene file multimediali su Phoenix Mars Lander







Nessun commento:

Posta un commento

Top News

Loading...

Presentazione candidature in quota UDC a Bologna - Lista Aldrovandi Sindaco

PLAYLIST MUSICALE 1^

Post più popolari

Elementi condivisi di PIETRO

Si è verificato un errore nel gadget

Rachel

Rachel

FORZA JUVE! E BASTA. FORZA DRUGHI!

FORZA JUVE! E BASTA. FORZA DRUGHI!

GALWAY - IRLANDA

GALWAY - IRLANDA

PUNTA ARENAS

PUNTA ARENAS

VULCANO OSORNO

VULCANO OSORNO
Si è verificato un errore nel gadget

Fairbanks

Fairbanks

Nicole Kidman - Birth , io sono Sean

Nicole Kidman - Birth , io sono Sean

DESERTO DI ATACAMA

DESERTO DI ATACAMA

Moorgh Lake Ramsey, Isle of Man

Moorgh Lake Ramsey, Isle of Man

Port Soderick

Port Soderick

TRAMONTO SU GERUSALEMME

TRAMONTO SU GERUSALEMME

Masada, l'inespugnabile

Masada, l'inespugnabile

KATYN

KATYN

I GUERRIERI DELLA NOTTE

I GUERRIERI DELLA NOTTE

L'assassinio di Jesse James per mano del codardo Robert Ford

L'assassinio di Jesse James per mano del codardo Robert Ford

THE WOLFMAN

THE WOLFMAN

Sistema Solare

Sistema Solare

TOMBSTONE

TOMBSTONE

coco

coco

PLAYLIST MUSICALE I^

Rebecca Hall

Rebecca Hall